Month: May 2017

We really enjoy working out. I mean a lot. Matt and I come from a CrossFit background, it’s true, but we like to say, “Any Fitness is Good Fitness”! That’s why we’re not exclusive to one form of function over another and encourage all our members, especially our Lifting Futures crew, to join us on Fitness Field Trips. What’s a Fitness Field Trip, you ask? It’s when we pile into the car, leave the comforts of our “home gym” and travel to a realm of the unknown. We’ve climbed hundreds of stairs to honor the fallen heroes of 9/11, twisted and turned in a Power Hatha Flow Yoga class, and achieved an incredible cardio session in Piyo. Have a favorite way to sweat? Tell us! We are always on the lookout for awesome new fitness adventures.

Great things happen when you step outside of your comfort zone, regardless of age or fitness level.

 

Positive relationship found between physical activity and cognitive function in school age children 4 – 18 years of age. This suggests that physical activity may be related to cognition during the development stages of children. Examinations of findings of Sibley and Etnier (A meta-analysis. Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2003;15:243–256) reveal that perceptual skills, intelligent quotient achievement, verbal tests, mathematics tests, memory, developmental level academic readiness and other key components of a child’s development indicate a beneficial relationship of physical activity on all cognitive categories, with the possible exception of memory. Increased levels of aerobic fitness were associated being beneficial to cognitive processes underlying cognitive control during adolescent development. NWFL Fitness’ Lifting Futures programs continues to promote findings as our base to promote the positive relationship between your child’s physical activity levels and their individual levels of cognitive thinking.

 

Figure showing Topographical amplitude maps for components for each age and fitness from each stimulus.

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(source: Pontifex MB, Hillman CH, Polich J. Age, physical fitness, and attention: P3a and P3b. Psychophysiology. 2009;46:379–387.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Ref list])